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Bioaccumulation and physiological responses of the turtle Chelydra serpentina exposed to polychlorinated biphenyls during early life stages.

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Colson, Tash-Lynn L., De Solla, Shane R. et Langlois, Valérie S. ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0003-4031-6838 (2021). Bioaccumulation and physiological responses of the turtle Chelydra serpentina exposed to polychlorinated biphenyls during early life stages. Chemosphere , vol. 263 . p. 128146. DOI: 10.1016/j.chemosphere.2020.128146.

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Résumé

Despite the North American production ban of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), PCBs are ubiquitous in the environment and in wildlife tissues. Chelydra serpentina serpentina (common snapping turtle) have been used as environmental indicators of PCB pollution upwards of 40 years given their high site fidelity and high trophic position. Despite their long use as indicators of PCB contamination, the effects of PCBs in reptiles remain largely unknown. In this study, we performed two experiments to assess i) bioaccumulation and ii) toxicity of PCBs to 1-month-old C. s. serpentina, to aid in interpretation of PCB burdens. Food pellets were spiked at an environmentally relevant concentration (0.45 μg/g) of the PCB mixture Aroclor 1254 to model hepatic bioaccumulation and depuration, through feeding, for 31 days and clean food for 50 days, respectively. No significant differences in PCB concentrations were observed in liver tissue over the course of the experiment, suggesting that juvenile turtles can likely metabolize low environmentally occurring concentrations of PCBs. Additionally, a dose-response experiment, performed to determine hepatic toxicity and bioaccumulation in juvenile C. s. serpentina, showed a 1.8-fold increase in hepatic expression of cyp1a when fed A1254-spiked pellets (12.7 μg/g; range 0–12.7 μg/g). This gene induction correlates with the significant increase of group 3 PCB congeners measured in the turtle liver, which are known to be metabolized by CYP1A. This study indicates that C. s. serpentina may be a good environmental indicator for PCBs, while more research is needed to assess the effects of body burdens in wild C. s. serpentina.

Type de document: Article
Mots-clés libres: snapping turtle; polychlorinated biphenyls; aroclor 1254; bioaccumulation; gene expression
Centre: Centre Eau Terre Environnement
Date de dépôt: 09 juin 2021 15:47
Dernière modification: 10 févr. 2022 21:11
URI: https://espace.inrs.ca/id/eprint/11495

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